Chaplin 1914

A Busy Day
R: Mack Sennett. B: Charles Chaplin. D: Charles Chaplin, Mack Swain, Phyllis Allen. P: Mack Sennett. USA 1914
Released May 7, 1914

A Busy Day was filmed in Wilmington on April 11, 1914 during a dedication ceremony and parade celebrating the Los Angeles Harbor expansion. A split-reel comedy, A Busy Day was originally released with the educational film The Morning Papers.”

The Masquerader
R: Charles Chaplin. B: Charles Chaplin. D: Charles Chaplin, Roscoe ‘Fatty’ Arbuckle, Chester Conklin. P: Mack Sennett. USA 1914
Released August 27, 1914

The Masquerader is the second of three comedies in which Chaplin appears as a woman; the earlier A Busy Day has Chaplin in crude drag playing a shrewish wife; the later A Woman (1915) further develops what he achieved in this comedy: a brilliant transformation to a soft, feminine, and seductive woman. The Masquerader is also one of several Chaplin comedies, like the earlier  A Film Johnnie and the later His New Job (1915) and Behind the Screen (1916), set in a motion picture studio.”

Comments:
Jeffrey Vance, adapted from his book Chaplin: Genius of the Cinema. New York 2003
Charlie Chaplin

A Film Johnnie
R: George Nichols. B: Craig Hutchinson. K: Frank D. Williams. D: Charles Chaplin, Roscoe ‘Fatty’ Arbuckle, Peggy Pearce, Mabel Normand, Ford Sterling. P: Keystone Film Company. USA 1914

Cruel, cruel Love
R: George Nichols, Mack Sennett. B: Craig Hutchinson. K: Frank D. Williams. D: Charles Chaplin, Edgar Kennedy, Minta Durfee, Eva Nelson. P: Keystone Film Company. USA 1914

“Presumably, Chaplin felt this scenario was so specific in its aims and intentions that he felt his Tramp simply didn’t belong in the melodrama. It also points to his continuing fluidity in these early films: his persona is by no means fixed. Of the nine films released in the first three months of 1914, Chaplin’s Tramp featured (in some form) in six, with Making a Living, Tango Tangles, and Cruel, Cruel Love seeing him trying out different looks and characters. The Tramp features in the overwhelming majority of the remainder of the 36 films released in 1914, but every so often — whether through boredom, experimentation, or to fit better with the scenario — Chaplin abandons his basic look for something else altogether. We’ll be seeing this costume — or a variation of it — again in Mabel at the Wheel (18 April 2014).”
Brian J. Robb
Chaplin: Film by Film

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