Electrocution

Execution of Czolgosz, with panorama of Auburn Prison
K: Edwin S. Porter. P: Thomas A. Edison. USA 1901
Print: Library of Congress

From a contemporary Edison film company catalog:
“A detailed reproduction of the execution of the assassin of President McKinley faithfully carried out from the description of an eye witness. The picture is in three scenes. First: Panoramic view of Auburn Prison taken the morning of the electrocution. The picture then dissolves into the corridor of murderer’s row. The keepers are seen taking Czolgosz from his cell to the death chamber, and shows State Electrician, Wardens and Doctors making final test of the chair. Czolgosz is then brought in by the guard and is quickly strapped into the chair. The current is turned on at a signal from the Warden, and the assassin heaves heavily as though the straps would break. He drops prone after the current is turned off. The doctors examine the body and report to the Warden that he is dead, and he in turn officially announces the death to the witness. Class B 200 ft. $24.00”
http://www.loc.gov/item/00694362/

“Born in 1873 in Detroit, Michigan, Leon Frank Czolgosz was the assassin of President William McKinley. He grew up poor as one of seven children born to immigrant parents. Czolgosz moved around a lot with his family between different Midwestern cities. He started working at the age of 10. A short time later, he lost his mother when she died in childbirth.
In Cleveland, Ohio, Czolgosz worked in the wire mills. He was known as a good employee and even received a merit-based pay raise. But Czolgosz eventually lost that job as the wire mill owners sought to cut workers’ wages. During the 1880s and 1890s, tensions ran high between workers and business owners over fair pay and working conditions. Czolgosz witnessed several violent strikes at large factories where he and his brothers worked. He also observed the disparity between the rich and the poor, which deeply angered him, and thus turned to socialist and anarchist teachings.”
http://www.biography.com/people/leon-frank-czolgosz-235807#early-life

>>>The Mob outside the Temple of Music at the Pan-American Exposition: The Mob Outside

 

 

America at Work

From the collection “America at Work, America at Leisure: Motion Pictures from 1894-1915”, Library of Congress, Washington D.C.

Girls Winding Armatures
K: G.W. “Billy” Bitzer. P: American Mutoscope & Biograph Co. USA 1904
Print: Library of Congress

Coil Winding Section E, Westinghouse Works
K: G.W. “Billy” Bitzer. P: American Mutoscope & Biograph Co. USA 1904
Print: Library of Congress

Assembling and Testing Turbines, Westinghouse Works
K: G.W. “Billy” Bitzer. P: American Mutoscope & Biograph Co. USA 1904
Print: Library of Congress

Testing Large Turbines, Westinghouse Co. Works
K: G.W. “Billy” Bitzer. P: American Mutoscope & Biograph Co. USA 1904
Print: Library of Congress

>>> About Bitzer on this site: G.W. “Billy” Bitzer

TRAUM UND EXZESS, S. 134

Italy’s Colonial Wars – 2

Dolorosi episodi della guerra Italo-Turca
R & K: Luca Comerio. P: Comerio Films, Milano. It 1912
Print: Museo Nazionale del Cinema, Torino

Episode of the series produced by Comerio dedicated to the Italo-Turk war. It features the departure of Lt. Paolo Solaroli’s body from Africa to Italy.

Sommergibili nel Mediterraneo (Submarines)
R & K: Luca Comerio. P: Comerio Films, Milano. It 1912
Print: Museo Nazionale del Cinema, Torino

“Documentary dedicated to the submarines assigned to the Italian Military Navy, shot by Luca Comerio in 1912, while the war in Libya was underway. The drills shown take place near the port of Taranto. In 2012 the National Cinema Museum preserved a small nucleus of war documentaries filmed by Comerio, restoring the colouring present in the nitrate prints of the time. Submarines is the film in which colour restoration most exalts the great talent of this documentary director as a cinematographer: Comerio alternates delicate blue toning with a suggestive coupling of tinting and toning to suggest the light play in a sunset over the sea.”
European Film Gate (EFG) 1914
http://www.europeana1914-1918.eu/de/europeana/record/08632/1037479000000304154

Italy’s Colonial Wars – 1

La nostra artiglieria in guerra
R & K: Luca Comerio. P: Comerio Films, Milano. It 1912
Print: Museo Nazionale del Cinema, Torino

Documentary dedicated to the artillery assigned to the Italian troops in Africa, shot by Luca Comerio in 1912, while the war in Libya was underway.

Theo Frenkel

Genie tegen geweld (Frgm.)
R: Theo Frenkel. D: Adelqui Migliar, Mary Beekman, Aaf Bouber. P: Amsterdam Film Cie. Ne 1916
Print: EYE Collection
German titles

“Detective Pim Bruce tries to solve a case of diamond theft and murder.
Van Duylen, representative of a diamond syndicate, brings to Amsterdam the “Koh-I-Noor II”, the largest diamond ever found. In one of the city’s oldest diamond-cutting establishments it is cleft and the nine small stones are polished. Escorted by detectives, Van Duylen takes the stones home and puts them in his burglar-proof safe. He tells his wife that its doors are electrically charged and that anyone opening them in the wrong way will immediately be electrocuted.
Two suspicious persons, Jack the Acrobat and the lion-tamer Feenstra, prowl around Van Duylen’s villa, inspecting the doors and windows. They go to their crony, the notorious burglar Nelis Veerman, to discuss their plan to steal the diamonds.”
Read more: https://www.eyefilm.nl/en/collection/film-history/film/genie-tegen-geweld

Het Wrak in de Noordzee
R: Theo Frenkel Sen. (i.e. Theo Bouwmeester). D: Thibault Bigot Jun., Aaf Bouber-ten Hoope, Piet Fuchs, Wilhelmina Kley, Kees Lageman. P: Amsterdam Film Cie. Ne 1915
Print: EYE Collection
French titles

Het wrak in de Noordzee (The North Sea Wreck) was the first film made by director Theo Frenkel’s own company Amsterdam Film Cie. Before Frenkel returned to the Netherlands in 1914, he had worked in France for Pathé Frères, in Great Britain for the producers Hepworth and Urban, and in the German capital for the film pioneer Oskar Messter and Eiko-Film. Back in the Netherlands, he made the film Fatum for the Rembrandt Film Co. Run by cinema operator and director Johan Gildemeijer; after this he established his own film company. The North Sea Wreck is a fisherman’s drama about the romance between the daughter of a Scheveningen captain and a young fisherman.”
http://www.eyefilm.nl/en/collection/film-history/movie/het-wrak-in-de-noordzee#cast

Alice in Spain

Espagne
R: Alice Guy. K: Anatole Thiberville. P: Gaumont. Fr 1906

1906 unternimmt Alice Guy, die erste Regisseurin und Produzentin der Filmgeschichte, bis 1907 Produktionsleiterin bei Gaumont, mit ihrem Kameramann eine Reise nach Spanien und hält ihre Eindrücke in dokumentarischen “Ansichten” von Städten, Landschaften und Bauwerken fest. Die Tanzszenen am Ende waren im Original mit Musik für Gaumonts Tonfilmverfahren Chronophon unterlegt.

Alice Guy-Filme auf dieser Website:
>>> La fée aux choux, L’émeute sur la barricade, Making an American Citizen, Algie the Miner

TRAUM UND EXZESS, S. 206 f.

Capellani 1906

Drame passionnel
R: Albert Capellani. B: André Heuzé. P: Pathé Frères. Fr 1906

La femme du lutteur
R: Albert Capellani. B: André Heuzé. P: Pathé Frères. Fr 1906

Pauvre mère
R: Albert Capellani. P: Pathé Frères. Fr 1906

“In contrast to Pathé’s previous films (…) Pauvre mère uses the spectacle of a POV(i.e. point of view)-shot sequence (observed by a female rather than by a male) as the pretext or narrative premise for an unrelenting series of moments of frustrated desire. (…) In privileging the relationship between mother and daughter and the emotional appeal of their shared desire, for instance, both La loi du pardon and Pauvre mère seem to address a specifically female spectator.”
Richard Abel: The Ciné Goes to Town. French Cinema 1896-1914. Berkeley-Los Angeles-London 1998, p. 135 f.

“Capellani’s speciality as a director is the broad scope of his narratives, connecting different locations and characters, which invests even short films with grandeur and space, to such an extent that the film lengths, given in either metres or minutes, often seem unbelievable. What? Can L’Épouvante really only be 11 minutes long? And Pauvre mère and Mortelle Idylle only 6 minutes each?”
Mariann Lewinsky on David Bordwell’s Observations on Film Art