Gavroche

Gavroche peintre célèbre
R: Romeo Bosetti. D: Paul Bertho. P: Société Française des Films Éclair. Fr 1912
Print: EYE
Dutch titles

Gavroche veut faire un riche mariage
R: Romeo Bosetti. D: Paul Bertho. P: Société Française des Films Éclair. Fr 1912
Print: EYE
Dutch titles

“Gavroche is a fictional character in the 1862 novel ‘Les Misérables’ by Victor Hugo. He is a boy who lives on the streets of Paris. His name has become a synonym for an urchin or street child. (…) During the student uprising of June 5–6, 1832, Gavroche joins the revolutionaries at the barricade. (…) He goes through an opening in the barricade and collects the cartridges from the dead bodies of the National Guard. In the process of collecting the cartridges and singing a song, he is shot and killed.* The character of Gavroche may have been inspired by a figure in Eugène Delacroix’s painting ‘Liberty Leading the People’, which depicts the successful 1830 July Revolution, two years before the events described in the novel. The painting depicts revolutionaries advancing from a barricade over the bodies of government troops. A young boy waving pistols leads the way, beside the figure of Liberty herself carrying the tricolore. The boy carries a cartridge box over his shoulder. (…) The words of the song sung by Gavroche before his death are a parody of conservative views about the French Revolution: blaming all alleged modern social and moral ills on the influence of Voltaire and Rousseau. Gavroche sings “Joie est mon caractère / C’est la faute à Voltaire / Misère est mon trousseau / C’est la faute à Rousseau.” (I have a cheerful character / It’s Voltaire’s fault / Misery is my bridal gown / It’s Rousseau’s fault).”
Wikipedia

Gavroche vend des parapluies
R: Romeo Bosetti. D: Paul Bertho. P: Société Française des Films Éclair. Fr 1913
Print: EYE
Dutch titles

Gavroche et Casimir s’entraînent
R: Romeo Bosetti. D: Paul Bertho, Lucien Bataille. P: Société Française des Films Éclair. Fr 1913
Print: EYE
Dutch titles

* see Alice Guy’s film L’émeute sur la barricade

>>> more about the lion comedy in the early film industry: here on this site